Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University back to all projects
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University
Al Jamea Tus Saifiyah University

Location: Nairobi, Kenya

A global design competition was held to design the campus for the JAMEA, a school for religious learning in Nairobi Kenya. There were precursors to the school in South Asia but this was the first time a design competition was held wherein the designers had to tie up with an Architect who was well versed in ?Fatemi? Architecture. The design concept was contemporary with references to the Quran incorporated in the spatial layout. Fatemi details were adapted to suit the local conditions.

The Jamea is an abode of wisdom, imparting knowledge, bringing peace, prosperity and reverence for Allah to all peoples of the world. The design integrates the Masjid, Madrasa, Manzil and the Mujtama into a unified spiritual ?city of learning.? Drawing from classical Fatemi urban planning where learning centres were brought within masjids, palaces and shrines: the place of worship, the place of learning, one?s abode and the greater society are conceived as one single spiritual city.The Jamea is an abode of wisdom, imparting knowledge, bringing peace, prosperity and reverence for Allah to all peoples of the world. The design integrates the Masjid, Madrasa, Manzil and the Mujtama into a unified spiritual ?city of learning.? Drawing from classical Fatemi urban planning where learning centres were brought within masjids, palaces and shrines: the place of worship, the place of learning, one?s abode and the greater society are conceived as one single spiritual city.

The design employs Fatemi motifs, planning patterns, visual devices and building components, rooting the Jamea within the millennium-long narrative emerging from the Fatemi Dynasty [969-1171]. Minarets, the mehrab, arched walls, Kufic inscription bands; arches within the masjid; and domes are inspired by Al-Juyushi, the hilltop masjid in Al Qahera. Al Aqmar inspired the use of medallions, arches, and the sun-like mudawwara at the main entry. The employment of a talismanic gate is borrowed from the Bab Al Nasr of Al Qahera.

These lyrical forces drove a search for the larger epic order that would eternally bind the Jamea into an everlasting system of being. The search for order was tempered by functional requirements and their interrelations; a strong construction system aligning the campus with Al Mecca; the employment of a central spine, or pedestrian Shaara, gifting skeletal order to the body of the Jamea; employment of Fatemi shared walls and courtyard urban fabric linking internal and external spaces. There is a search for the Jamea?s monumental, inherent spiritual quality, in its architectural order and built form, conveying its eternity; that in this diverse and changing world there are truths that cannot be added to, subtracted from, or changed. The revelations of the Prophet are monumental and this must be reflected in the ?body of the Jamea.?

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